THE INTERNET AS A DEEP ART EXPERIENCE OF LIBERATION

complexity_network

In an art with depth, the object is not really there. In a sense what is given in this kind of art is a specular image reflected into a third mirror (see our earlier essays on Rodrigo Garcia, Luigi Nono and Zabriskie Point). What this does is add distance to any mimicry, and, at the same time, to any complexity. Deep art should be imagined as a kind of maze which first appears as a box or room, but with invisible doors or walls that can be pushed open if one knows how. These doors lead one into more spaces of different sizes, each one with its own exits unto more seemingly enclosed systems. The richness of the experience lies in the fact that each exit can only be discovered if one can know or can discover the symbolic reference to the next space.

Could the Internet be considered an autarchic experience of deep art? In order to do so, one would need to be willing and capable of losing oneself within it, and likewise be capable of stepping away from it in order to analyse the experience from the advantage of distance. What’s more, for a deep art experience to take place, one must be prepared to pause and linger at times, so hard in the Internet which obsessively pushes any audience on to new topics, inviting, tempting, forcing us at times to leave the room we first of all settled in. The Internet experience can get so foggy that we even forget where we started from. For a deep art experience to be meaningful one must have one’s imagination firmly rooted in where one came from in the first place. It is a labyrinth in which one never completely loses touch with the original point of departure. The original room is that which allows us to navigate: forgetting where we are coming from will make it impossible for us to find our way forward or back. It is only by learning how and when to move slowly through the maze that one can dominate it and allow it to become an enriching rather than a frustrating experience.

Or perhaps the Internet is too autistic to be truly satisfying. It has its webcams and its chats, but they don’t belong to the autarchic labyrinth we are interested in here. What we are interested in is its power as a vital museum, come encyclopaedic library, come art gallery, come theatre and cinema and concert hall. But its very immersing quality robs us of the real vital experience we have when we go to these traditional spaces to witness art. It lacks the public. And here we must ask ourselves: how much does the experience of great art depend on it being a public act? Or, should art be classified into the public and private experience? Theatre, for example, is impossible to conceive without an audience (the more the merrier), whilst a novel is a purely private experience (a public reading of a novel is hardly likely to be as enjoyable as the experience of reading to oneself). Could it be said that the richest art-culture experience has to include both possibilities? Does the Internet do this, if only potentially?

Does the Internet disclose any truth? Or even attempt to disclose truth? And, what kind of intersubjectivity is unleashed in its relationship between the artist and the spectator? Only when the Internet is used in its immense folding and unfolding capacity, in a meaningful disclosing way under an artist’s control, will we be able to consider it capable of offering a deeply artistic experience. This is possible. It is certainly a potentially powerful tool for accessing information, and culture is information. What Internet does, by presenting a potential access to universal information and culture universally, is pave the way to a universal culture, which, if it is honestly expressed, must be an authentically human culture. Whilst the Internet is free from manipulation and censorship there is hope for a universal, human cultural development. In fact a free Internet is humanity’s best chance for a free world.

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3 thoughts on “THE INTERNET AS A DEEP ART EXPERIENCE OF LIBERATION

  1. The Internet itself as art? Or the experience of the Internet as art? In “The Art Spirit,” Robert Henri wrote, “Seeing beauty in nature is a compositional act.” Perhaps seeing beauty in the Internet–not at an isolated website, but in the experience of surfing the Internet–could also be considered a compositional act and therefore art: the art of surfing the Internet. I suspect that some people experience an aesthetic response to surfing the Internet that is separate from their aesthetic response to any particular website. If so, that aesthetic response in itself could signal the presence of art. In that view, the artistic qualities of the Internet would constitute emergent phenomena–and very transient ones.

  2. Pingback: DOXA AND ALETHEIA – TRUTH AND THE ARTIST (PART FOUR) | pauladkin

  3. I think the self reflective nature of the pattern recognition triggered by the internet as universal culture-sphere (and allowing for replay, revisiting media and experiences via photos, blogs, etc.) is both aesthetic and spiritually (religiously) affective – ive been writing about it from a religious studies/comparative myth/religion perspective, informed by media theory (McLuhan for one), and it seems to both combine the essential individual self-recognition of digital media use and the universality conveyed by the web, producing a sort of microcosm-macrocosm awareness, similar or parallel to your treatment of aletheia and doxa, though where these are in a resonant accord, art as life, life as art, etc.

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